REMEMBER TO WEAR DENIM TOMORROW!!

No Excuse: A promise to take action against sexual violence

Sexual Assault is being brought out of the shadows because people are breaking away from the silence, the shame, and the stigma. People are taking action against false and destructive assumptions about sexual assault. The conditions that have allowed rape and other forms of sexual violence to persist are changing—not because of the news cycle or social fads but because social norms are being challenged by people like you. You have chosen to recognize that sexual violence is everyone’s issue. It’s time to take action for change!

This is a promise, a message to the entire community. It is a rallying cry for everyone to engage, to connect and to take leadership on this issue.

One on one. One by one.

I PROMISE TO UPHOLD THESE 4 ACTIONS:

1. TO RECOGNIZE THAT SEXUAL VIOLENCE IS EVERYONE’S ISSUE

2. PARTICIPATE IN THE NATIONAL CONVERSATION ABOUT RAPE AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE WITH THE HASHTAGS #GEARUP #DENIMDAY

3. TO SUPPORT SURVIVORS AND NOT BLAME THE VICTIM

4. TO ENGAGE IN HEALTHY AND VIOLENCE FREE RELATIONSHIPS

Register and make the promise here.

Find Denim Day events in your area here.

About Denim Day:

Denim Day is a campaign to prevent sexual violence through education and public awareness. April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and Denim Day is a call to action for all people to come together by wearing denim as a visible sign of protest against sexual violence. By participating in Denim Day this April, you can play a role in the prevention of sexual violence. Every year we ask community members, elected officials, businesses and students to make a social statement with their fashion and on April 26th to wear jeans as a visible means of protest against misconceptions that surround sexual assault.

Why denim? Denim Day was originally triggered by a ruling by the Italian Supreme Court where a rape conviction was overturned because the justices felt that since the victim was wearing tight jeans she must have helped her rapist remove her jeans, thereby implying consent. The following day, the women in the Italian Parliament came to work wearing jeans in solidarity with the victim. Denim Day was developed in response to this case and wearing jeans during this annual event has become a symbol of protest against erroneous and destructive attitudes about sexual assault.

Women of the Italian Legislature protested the decision by wearing jeans to work. As news of the decision spread, so did the protest. In April 1999, a social service agency in Los Angeles established the first Denim Day in the United States.

3 COMMENTS

  1. This is a long article. I want to remind people of the link between denim and sexual assault awareness.

    Why denim? Denim Day was originally triggered by a ruling by the Italian Supreme Court where a rape conviction was overturned because the justices felt that since the victim was wearing tight jeans she must have helped her rapist remove her jeans, thereby implying consent. The following day, the women in the Italian Parliament came to work wearing jeans in solidarity with the victim. Denim Day was developed in response to this case and wearing jeans during this annual event has become a symbol of protest against erroneous and destructive attitudes about sexual assault.

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